Robert Nozick

Individuals have rights and there are things no person or group may do to them (without violating their rights).
Anarchy, State, and Utopia
Our main conclusions about the state are that a minimal state, limited, to the narrow functions of protection against force, theft, fraud, enforcement of contracts, and so on, is justified, but any more extensive state will violate persons' rights not to be forced to do certain things, and is unjustified; and that the minimal state is inspiring as well as right.
Anarchy, State, and Utopia
Our starting point then, though nonpolitical, is by intention far from nonmoral. Moral philosophy sets the background for, and boundaries of, political philosophy. What persons may and may not do to one another limits what they may do through the apparatus of a state, or do to establish such an apparatus.
Anarchy, State, and Utopia
Taxation of earnings from labor is on a par with forced labor. Seizing the results of someone's labor is equivalent to seizing hours from him and directing him to carry on various activities.
Anarchy, State, and Utopia
You can't satisfy everybody; especially if there are those who will be dissatisfied unless not everybody is satisfied.
Anarchy, State, and Utopia
Utopia is a meta-utopia: the environment in which Utopian experiments may be tried out; the environment in which people are free to do their own thing; the environment which must, to a great extent, be realized first if more particular Utopian visions are to be realized stably.
Anarchy, State, and Utopia